A woman places a candle in front of one of many white crosses set up for the victims of the Route 91 Harvest music festival mass shooting in Las Vegas, October 6, 2017.
Chris Wattie / Reuters

Since declaring its so-called caliphate in the summer of 2014, the Islamic State (also known as ISIS) has claimed responsibility for more than a dozen attacks in the West. Seven of them have occurred in the United States—most recently in Las Vegas. Stephen Paddock, a 64-year-old American whose religious interests remain a mystery, converted a luxury hotel room into a sniper’s perch and took aim at concert-goers gathered beneath his window, killing nearly 60 people and wounding hundreds more. Shortly after, via its Amaq “news service,” ISIS asserted that Paddock was a “soldier of the Islamic State who carried out the attack in response to calls for targeting coalition countries.” In a separate Amaq report, ISIS explained, Paddock “converted to Islam months before the attack.” Soon after, the group issued an official statement, in which it claimed that the shooting was in response to ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi’s

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