Opposition supporters take part in a march against the government of Nicolas Maduro in Caracas, October 18, 2014.
Jorge Silva / Reuters

Minerva Ramos isn’t taking any chances in the run-up to this Sunday’s National Assembly elections in Venezuela. A 45-year-old housewife in the central city of Maracay, Ramos has been loading up on crackers, cans of sardines, and other non-perishables for her family of five. She fears the worst.

“Who knows what’s going to happen on Sunday?” she says, worry etched on her face. “I think the opposition will win the election, but what will the government do? Will they accept the results? Will they take to the streets? Will they steal the election? If they do, will the opposition take to the streets? It’s better to build up a reserve, even though there isn’t that much to buy.”

Venezuelans line up to buy vegetables at a street market in Caracas, December 2, 2015.
Venezuelans line up to buy vegetables at a street market in Caracas, December 2, 2015.
Nacho Doce / Reuters
Polls suggest that the Democratic Unity (MUD, as it is known by its Spanish acronym) will win handily over President Nicolas Maduro’s United Socialist Party of

To read the full article