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Do Nuclear Weapons Matter?

5:00pm-7:30pm
Council on Foreign Relations

58 E 68th Street

New York, NY 10065

Every year, world powers spend vast sums to upgrade and maintain nuclear arsenals and to prevent their spread to other nations—notably, to North Korea and Iran. Such weapons could unleash unimaginable destruction and remain an ever-present specter in the public eye, yet they have not been used since World War II and feared disasters have not materialized. Nuclear armament and proliferation recently returned to foreign policy agendas in ways that are reminiscent of the Cold War, however. Three quarters of a century into the atomic age, are they still the danger we once thought they were, and how do they stack up against other threats to national security, global peace and prosperity?

Join Foreign Affairs and Scientific American for a panel discussion exploring these questions. The discussion will be followed by a cocktail reception.

*This event is by invitation only. If you know your access code please register online or request an invitation at events@foreignaffairs.com.*

5:00 PM – 5:20 PM: Check-in

5:20 PM – 6:30 PM: Panel Discussion  

Elbridge Colby, Director of Defense, Center for a New American Security; U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Strategy and Force Development (2017–18)

Gideon Rose, Editor, Foreign Affairs

Nina Tannenwald, Director of the International Relations Program at the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs, Brown University

Moderator: Curtis Brainard, Managing Editor, Scientific American

6:30 PM – 7:30 PM: Cocktail Reception 

Curtis Brainard, Managing Editor, Scientific American

Curtis Brainard is the Managing Editor of Scientific American and he sits on the governing board of the World Federation of Science Journalists. His writing has appeared in Columbia Journalism Review, The New York Times, The New Yorker, Popular Science, and other publications.

Elbridge Colby, Director of Defense Program, Center for a New American Security; U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Strategy and Force Development from 2017–18

Elbridge Colby is the Director of the Defense Program at the Center for a New American Security, where he leads CNAS’ work on defense issues. Previously, Colby served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Strategy and Force Development from 2017-2018. In that role, he served as the lead official in the development and rollout of the Department’s preeminent strategic planning guidance, the 2018 National Defense Strategy (NDS). Prior to entering government service, Colby was from 2014 to 2017 the Robert M. Gates Senior Fellow at the Center for a New American Security, where he focused on a range of defense issues and consulted regularly with the Defense Department and other U.S. Government elements. Colby is the author of many book chapters, reports, and articles on defense and foreign policy issues, and co-edited a volume on Strategic Stability: Contending Interpretations. His work has appeared in outlets such as Foreign Affairs, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The National Interest, Foreign Policy, and Survival. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the International Institute of Strategic Studies. Colby is a graduate of Harvard College and Yale Law School.

Gideon Rose, Editor, Foreign Affairs

Gideon Rose was appointed Editor of Foreign Affairs in October 2010. He was Managing Editor of the magazine from 2000 to 2010. He has also served as Associate Director for Near East and South Asian Affairs on the staff of the National Security Council and Deputy Director of National Security Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, and has taught American foreign policy at Princeton and Columbia. He is the author of How Wars End (Simon & Schuster, October 2010).

Nina Tannenwald, Director of the International Relations Program at the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs, Brown University

Nina Tannenwald is Director of the International Relations Program at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International Studies and a Senior Lecturer in Political Science.  Her research focuses on the role of international institutions, norms and ideas in global security issues, efforts to control weapons of mass destruction, and human rights and the laws of war. Her book, The Nuclear Taboo:  The United States and the Non-use of Nuclear Weapons Since 1945 was awarded the 2009 Lepgold Prize for best book in international relations.  Her current research projects include targeted killing, the future of the nuclear normative order, and the effectiveness of the laws of war. In 2012-2013 she served as a Franklin Fellow in the Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation in the U.S. State Department. She holds a master’s degree from the Columbia School of International and Public Affairs and a Ph.D. in international relations from Cornell University.

 

Scientific American is the award-winning authoritative source for the science discoveries and technology innovations that matter. The longest continuously published magazine in the U.S., Scientific American has been bringing its readers unique insights about developments in science and technology for more than 170 years. The magazine is published in 14 languages with 9.5 million print and tablet readers worldwide, 10+ million global online unique visitors monthly, and a social media reach of 7+ million.

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