Pascal Rossignol / Reuters A migrant from Syria warms his hands over a fire in at the Grande-Synthe refugee camp in Calais, France, December 30, 2015.
Pascal Rossignol / Reuters A young girl from Kurdistan leaves her tent in a refugee camp that is known as the Grande-Synthe “jungle” in Calais, France, December 29, 2015.
Pascal Rossignol / Reuters Mud-covered boots are placed outside the tents where migrants prepare food, Calais, France, December 29, 2015.
Pascal Rossignol / Reuters A migrant walks between makeshift shelters in Calais, France, December 30, 2015.
Pascal Rossignol / Reuters Adam, a 42-year-old migrant from Kurdistan, sits in an abandoned van that he uses for shelter, Calais, France, December 29, 2015.
Pascal Rossignol / Reuters Calais, France, December 30, 2015.
Pascal Rossignol / Reuters Migrants stand near a tent that has "Open the Border" written on it, Calais, France, December 29, 2015.
Pascal Rossignol / Reuters A migrant is reflected in a puddle of muddy water as he walks through a field in Grande-Synthe in Calais, France, December 30, 2015.
Pascal Rossignol / Reuters A shopkeeper sits inside in his grocery store at the Grande-Synthe refugee camp in Calais, France, December 30, 2015.
Pascal Rossignol / Reuters Ranj and Hardi, both from Kurdistan, pose beside a fire near their shelter in Calais, France, December 30, 2015.
Pascal Rossignol / Reuters A migrant walks past a mock publicity poster that reads, "Escape is at the end of the road," Calais, France, December 30, 2015.
Philippe Wojazer / Reuters A migrant builds the roof of a new mosque to replace the makeshift one in the "New Jungle" camp in Calais, France, October 14, 2015.
Pascal Rossignol / Reuters A young boy from Kurdistan walks through the Grande-Synthe refugee camp in Calais, France, December 30, 2015.
Pascal Rossignol / Reuters Iranian migrants warm their hands over a fire at the Grande-Synthe refugee camp in Calais, France, December 30, 2015.
Philippe Wojazer / Reuters Migrants discuss in front of the church in the New Jungle make-shift camp in Calais, northern France, October 14, 2015.
Pascal Rossignol / Reuters Aerial view of a makeshift camp as containers (rear) are put into place to house several hundred migrants living in what is known as the "Jungle," a squalid sprawling camp in Calais, France, January 17, 2016.

Inside the Migrant Jungle

Like the people who live in it, the Jungle migrant camp in northern France has a tendency to pick up and relocate. In 2002, the French authorities dismantled the first Jungle, which was located in Sangette. It soon reassembled in a different spot. When the authorities tried to shut it down again in 2009, the camp simply picked up and grew larger. Today, the Jungle has migrated to Calais, a city that sits at the mouth of the French side of the Eurotunnel. It houses 3,000 to 5,000 migrants, mostly from Afghanistan, Eritrea, and Sudan, with a growing number of Syrians. They are waiting for their chance to cross the Chunnel into the United Kingdom. Last year, hundreds stopped traffic while making the dash.

The migrants have equipped the Jungle with mosques, churches, restaurants, and even a Narcotics Anonymous for the heroin-addicted. But it never stays still for too long. France has enticed at least 1,000 out of their tents and into heated containers nearby, in exchange for their registration. And on February 2, the government sent bulldozers to the Jungle and razed  a mosque and a church—allegedly to create a 330-foot security clearing around the camp. Angry, but undeterred, most of the migrants have simply pushed their tents deeper into the Jungle.

More Photo Galleries

Browse All Photo Galleries