Anna Filipova / Reuters An old locomotive train that was used for transporting coal is preserved as a monument, Norway, October 13, 2015.
Anna Filipova / Reuters The scientific base of Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway, October 14, 2015.
Anna Filipova / Reuters Radar antennas at the European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association facility on Breinosa, Norway, October 24, 2015.
Anna Filipova / Reuters Dogs, either family pets or used for dog sledges, wait outside the settlement, Norway, October 22, 2015.
Anna Filipova / Reuters The northernmost non-military post office in the world at the Kings Bay research station, Norway, October 18, 2015.
Anna Filipova / Reuters A weather station in Ny-Alesund, a base for international scientists, Norway, October 17, 2015.
Anna Filipova / Reuters Workers’ housing in Longyerbyean, Norway, October 23, 2015.
Anna Filipova / Reuters The research center, Norway, October 19, 2015.
Anna Filipova / Reuters The old radio station for the mining town is now a telegraph museum in Ny-Alesund, Norway, October 13, 2015.
Anna Filipova / Reuters The research center in Ny-Alesund, which was formerly a coal mining town in Norway, October 13, 2015.
Anna Filipova / Reuters Breinosa mountain from the research Zeppelin Observatory in Svalbard, Norway, October 17, 2015.
Anna Filipova / Reuters Kings Bay in Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway, October 12, 2015.
Anna Filipova / Reuters The snow-covered Broggerdalen mountain near Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway, October 11, 2015.
Anna Filipova / Reuters Dinghies and research vessels sit in the small harbor on Spitsbergen, Norway, October 15, 2015.
Anna Filipova / Reuters A locomotive train that now serves as a monument, Norway, October 11, 2015.
Anna Filipova / Reuters The residential and research settlement areas for scientists at Kings Bay, Norway, October 15, 2015.
Anna Filipova / Reuters Warehouses and the old part of the Ny-Alesund settlement from its coal mining days, Norway, October 11, 2015.
Anna Filipova / Reuters Radar dish and antennas systems at the research center in Norway, October 24, 2015.
Anna Filipova / Reuters A sculpted bust of Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen at the scientific base, Norway, October 18, 2015.

Norway's Retired Coal Island

Ny-Alesund, the world's northernmost settlement, lies 750 miles from the North Pole on a Norwegian archipelago called Svalbard. Like other towns on the coal-rich island chain, it is coming to terms with the country's shift away from fossil fuels. Ny-Alesund was built a century ago around one mine, but in the winter of 1962, a dramatic explosion killed 21 workers and the mine was shuttered. Since then, the town, which is oft-visited by polar bears and the northern lights, has relied partly on tourism to prop up its economy. Scientists have also shown increasing interest in Ny-Alesund because its position in the arctic allows them to study early signs of climate change. Since 1992, 11 nations have built research stations there.

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