Danish Siddiqui / Reuters Windows and doors of an old residential building in central Mumbai, October 10, 2014.
Danish Siddiqui / Reuters A woman hangs clothes outside the window of an apartment, Mumbai, October 1, 2014.
Danish Siddiqui / Reuters A high-rise residential tower next to a tower under construction, Mumbai, March 15, 2015.
Danish Siddiqui / Reuters Mumbai, January 27, 2015.
Danish Siddiqui / Reuters Mumbai, January 22, 2015.
Danish Siddiqui / Reuters Mumbai, March 18, 2015.
Danish Siddiqui / Reuters Mumbai, January 12, 2015.
Danish Siddiqui / Reuters Mumbai, January 12, 2015.
Danish Siddiqui / Reuters Workers take a lift at an under-construction high-rise residential tower in Mumbai's central financial district, August 25, 2014.
Danish Siddiqui / Reuters Mumbai, March 15, 2015.
Danish Siddiqui / Reuters Mumbai, March 15, 2015.
Danish Siddiqui / Reuters Mumbai, February 19, 2014.
Danish Siddiqui / Reuters Facades of different old residential buildings in south Mumbai, March 15, 2015.
Danish Siddiqui / Reuters Mumbai, February 13, 2014.
Danish Siddiqui / Reuters A man stands next to a window, Mumbai, January 28, 2015.
Danish Siddiqui / Reuters Windows of various shanties in Dharavi, Mumbai, January 28, 2015.
Danish Siddiqui / Reuters Residents look out of an apartment window, Mumbai, March 15, 2015.
Danish Siddiqui / Reuters A resident locks the door of an apartment, Mumbai, January 28, 2015.
Danish Siddiqui / Reuters Dharavi, one of Asia's largest slums, in Mumbai, March 18, 2015.
Danish Siddiqui / Reuters High-rise residential towers are seen behind shanties in Dharavi, Mumbai, March 18, 2015.

How Mumbai's Other Half Lives

In many ways, Mumbai is today what New York City was in the 1800s: fast growing, squalid, and powered in part by graft and greed. Although new high rises have begun to crowd the Mumbai skyline, only 10 to 15 percent of the city's inhabitants live in actual apartments, some no larger than 48 square feet. The majority, most of whom are poverty-stricken, live in slums, shanties, or chawls—an Indian version of a tenement. But a major difference between modern Mumbai and nineteenth century New York is that its population is four times larger. In the next decade, Mumbai will become a megacity with a population of 22.5 million. And what's more, in New York City, thanks in part to the shocking exposés of investigative journalists like Jacob Riis and the slum clearing policies of President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal, tenements were largely history by the mid-twentieth century. In contrast, the World Bank predicts that slums are on the rise in Mumbai and will overrun the city by 2025.

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