Enrique de la Osa / Reuters The Ladies in White meet for their weekly anti-government protest march, Havana, September 13, 2015.
Alexandre Meneghini / Reuters Havana, December 10, 2015.
Alexandre Meneghini / Reuters Cuban security personnel detain a member of the Ladies in White dissident group during a protest on International Human Rights Day, Havana, Cuba, December 10, 2015.
Alexandre Meneghini / Reuters Havana, December 10, 2015.
Enrique de la Osa / Reuters A member of the Ladies in White is detained after an anti-government protest march, Havana, September 13, 2015.
Enrique de la Osa / Reuters Havana, September 13, 2015.
Enrique de la Osa / Reuters Havana, September 13, 2015.
Enrique de la Osa / Reuters Havana, September 13, 2015.
Enrique de la Osa / Reuters Berta Soler, leader of The Ladies in White, carries a banner with an image of the movement’s founder, Laura Pollan, Havana, September 13, 2015.
Enrique de la Osa / Reuters The Ladies in White protest on a street, Havana, September 13, 2015.
Gary Cameron / Reuters U.S. Senator Robert Menendez (D-NJ) escorts the leader of Ladies in White Berta Solar (R), to a hearing on U.S. President Barack Obama's changes to Cuba policy, Washington, February 3, 2015.
Stringer / Reuters Members of the Ladies in White line up to kiss a statue of Jesus Christ during a mass, Havana, April 18, 2014.
Enrique de la Osa / Reuters Cuban dissident Hector Maseda hugs his wife Laura Pollan after being released from prison, Havana, February 12, 2011.

Cuba's Damas de Blanco

In 2003, Cuba imprisoned dozens of dissidents, lawyers, and journalists, whom it accused  of colluding with the West to bring down the government. A few weeks after the jailings, a group of women, many of them the wives of the political prisoners, took to the streets of Havana dressed in white—to signify innocence—and demanded the release of their family members. Although most of the prisoners were let go some years later, many of the women have been blacklisted and are unable to find work. And so, the group Damas de Blanco ("Ladies in White") persists. Its members demonstrate every Sunday after attending mass together. But so far, their actions have done little to end government repression, and before U.S. President Barack Obama's visit to Cuba in March, the police arrested around 50 ladies in white during their usual post-mass protest.

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