In This Review

The Cold War and the University: Towards an Intellectual History
The Cold War and the University: Towards an Intellectual History
Edited by André Schiffrin
New Press, 1997, 259 pp.

The essays collected in The Cold War and the University take as their theme the effects of the Cold War on academic life and thought in America over five decades. The authors speak from their own experiences, many through autobiographical narrative and personal testimony. They speak, too, from the perspective of their disciplines, clustered in the social sciences-history (David Montgomery and Howard Zinn), political science (Ira Katznelson), anthropology (Laura Nader), sociology (Immanuel Wallerstein)- but also including evolutionary biology (Richard Lewontin) and the earth sciences (Ray Siever), linguistics (Noam Chomsky) and English literature (Richard Ohmann).

Although the volume does not

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  • Hanna Holborn Gray served from 1978 to 1993 as President of the University of Chicago, where she is now Harry Pratt Judson Distinguished Service Professor of History.
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