In This Review

Where the East Begins
Where the East Begins
By Hamilton Fish Armstrong
Harper, 1929, 139 pp

The tangled and confused politics of the Balkan states can hardly be satisfactorily followed from the reports of the daily press or from the periodical literature. General books which set forth the principal factors and leading motives in Balkan affairs will, therefore, always be welcome to the student. On this side of the water there is probably no one better fitted to supply an occasional stock-taking than the writer of the present volume, who has made a study of this phase of international affairs and has constantly renewed his contacts with persons and events in the Balkan scene during the past decade. He discusses the key problems of the various states in a sympathetic and understanding way, with particular emphasis on the new dictatorship in Jugoslavia, the return of Venizelos in Greece, the peasant régime in Rumania, and the Albanian problem in its international aspects. The final chapter, which surveys the broad trend in Balkan affairs since the peace treaties, cannot be too highly recommended to the student of Near Eastern affairs.