In This Review

Bliss, Peacemaker
Bliss, Peacemaker
By Frederick Palmer
Dodd, 1934, 486 pp.

An important contribution to the history of American diplomacy, based upon the papers of the former Chief of Staff and American member of the Supreme War Council. General Bliss was a learned soldier, an uncommon type, combining practical experience in the military art with a deep knowledge of history and a concern for contemporary international relations. The present volume contains chapters on Cuba (1898-1900) and the Philippines (1905-1909). But it of course derives its real importance from the light it throws on the conduct of the war and on the Paris Peace Conference. The author makes it clear that General Bliss exercised more influence on American policy as a member of the Supreme War Council than in framing the terms of peace. Some of his views, one is bound to think, often were nearer right than those of other advisers to whom the President listened with more attention in Paris. The volume devotes too little space to General Bliss's activities in the post-war years, when he arranged his political theories in order and wrote and spoke them publicly with great effect.