In This Review

Nuclear Proliferation: Motivations, Capabilities, and Strategies For Control
Nuclear Proliferation: Motivations, Capabilities, and Strategies For Control
By Ted Greenwood, Harold A. Feiveson and Theodore B. Taylor
McGraw-Hill (for the Council on Foreign Relations/1980s Project), 1977, 210 pp

A solid package of two essays on the motives and the technical capabilities threatening further nuclear weapons spread. The first ("motives") half of the book, by Greenwood, makes several major points: that the situation is far from hopeless but that some important prices will have to be paid to halt proliferation, that no single once-and-for-all solutions will suffice, and that what is good for stopping proliferation may sometimes be bad for the rest of arms control (the "dove's dilemma"). The "capabilities" half, by Feiveson and Taylor, is a clearly written presentation of some important qualitative choices in nuclear technology, beyond simply "tolerating" or "holding back."