In This Review

The Outsiders: The Western Experience in India and China
The Outsiders: The Western Experience in India and China
By Rhoads Murphey
University of Michigan Press, 1977, 299 pp

One of the few China specialists who venture forth from the parochial realm of Sinology, Murphey shows the utility, indeed the necessity, of comparison. By examining the divergent Chinese and Indian responses to Western incursions, he helps to identify the particular nature of both cultures. For example: while the colonial port cities in South and Southeast Asia were the vanguard of socioeconomic transformation, in China the treaty ports not only were not the agents of change but they became the targets of an anti-urban revolution led by the Communists. In explaining why China was able to resist Western-oriented, urban-centered modernization, Murphey goes a long way toward demonstrating China's distinctiveness - a long acquired experience in creating and managing a complex, sophisticated production system.