In This Review

Congress and the Fall of South Vietnam and Cambodia
Congress and the Fall of South Vietnam and Cambodia
By P. Edward Haley
Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1982, 227 pp

The author of this sharply focused case study makes an analytically valuable distinction between two presidential approaches to Congress in the realm of foreign affairs. One is to seek informed support, as, for example, with the Marshall Plan. The other is "the politics of acquiescence," in which congressional silence, the absence of expressed opposition, is assumed to mean consent. The fall of Cambodia and South Vietnam was the disastrous climax of the second approach. Although both branches were "partners in failure," Haley's most serious criticism is reserved for President Nixon and Secretary Kissinger. But the author warns against the bleak conclusion that presidents and Congress cannot work effectively together.