In This Review

U.S. Ground Forces and the Defense of Central Europe
U.S. Ground Forces and the Defense of Central Europe
By William P. Mako
Brookings, 1983, 137 pp.

Complementing the study above, this work focuses on manpower and the deployment of ground forces. Mako examines and gives a fair hearing to the various arguments for altering the U.S. contribution to NATO. Looking at the military balance in Central Europe, he concludes that neither NATO nor the Warsaw Pact can be confident of the outcome of a conventional war. He is concerned about the risk of a conflict outside of Europe leading to a diversion of forces to another theater, or preventing reinforcements from coming from the United States to NATO. Altogether, however, he believes that the present posture is roughly adequate and recommends only a modest strengthening of reserve forces and augmentation of their sealift capability.