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Soviet Dissent: Contemporary Movements For National, Religious and Human Rights
Soviet Dissent: Contemporary Movements For National, Religious and Human Rights
By Ludmilla Alexeyeva
Wesleyan University Press, 1985, 522 pp
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Although the author was active in the human rights movement and forced to emigrate in 1977, this is not a personal memoir but a massive compendium of information on all the strands of opposition in the Soviet Union since Stalin. It covers the writings and activities of Ukrainian, Baltic and other nationalists, displaced nationalities such as the Crimean Tatars, religious sects, Helsinki Watch groups, independent workers organizations, champions of intellectual and artistic freedom, Jewish refuseniks and many others. It is a work of great value based on wide research in many sources, especially little-known samizdat literature. The volume and variety of dissent described in these pages may give the impression of a more widespread and effective opposition than exists in reality, though the author recognizes that in recent years the regime has been largely successful in stifling it.