In This Review

Up Against the Fences: Poverty, Passes and Privilege in South Africa
Up Against the Fences: Poverty, Passes and Privilege in South Africa
Edited by Hermann Giliomee and Lawrence Schlemmer
St. Martin's, 1985, 365 pp.

This impressive collection minutely scrutinizes an area very seldom systematically surveyed-the relation between blacks' welfare in the urban and homelands areas. Amassing overwhelming evidence for a proposition few South Africa-watchers would dispute-that the homelands are not viable economic entities-the authors also demonstrate that the influx laws do not control the flow of blacks to South Africa's cities, and that despite growing class differences virtually no blacks support maintaining insider/ outsider distinctions through influx control. The editors advocate phasing out controls and see increased scope for shack development as a flexible way to expand urban options for blacks.