In This Review

National Security Interests in the Pacific Basin
National Security Interests in the Pacific Basin
Edited by Claude A. Buss
Hoover Press, 1985, 350 pp

In an otherwise rather routine set of conference papers, Ralph Clough does an excellent job of putting China's relations with the Soviet Union in perspective. In Clough's opinion, Deng and his associates continue to view the Soviet Union as the primary threat to China's security, but they have altered their views on the immediacy of the Soviet threat and the appropriate tactics for dealing with it. Some easing of tension between Moscow and Beijing will probably occur but the Soviets are unlikely to make the concessions needed to draw Beijing closer to Moscow than it is to Washington; Americans need not become nervous every time the Chinese and Soviets sit down together to work out differences. In another good insight into Chinese strategic thinking, Jonathan Pollak points out that, according to Chinese strategists, both superpowers will appear much less "super" in the future and will need to solicit others rather than dominate them. Thus the "intermediate forces" within the international system-China, Japan and Western Europe-will begin to assume a larger political and strategic role in a multipolar international system.