In This Review

The Other Walls: The Politics of the Arab-Israeli Peace Process
The Other Walls: The Politics of the Arab-Israeli Peace Process
By Harold H. Saunders
American Enterprise Institute, 1985, 177 pp

Because Harold Saunders was closely involved in making and carrying out U.S. policy in the Middle East in four administrations, from Johnson's through Carter's, what he writes on the Arab-Israeli peace process deserves a careful reading. He does not attempt to recount the history of the wars and negotiations of that period or to review and correct the accounts written by others. His purpose is to explore and expose the nature of the problem in its human and political dimensions, to show why peacemaking has been so difficult and how it might be approached with greater understanding and success in the future. The primary requirement, he contends, is not clever formulas or outside pressures but the creation of a political environment which makes serious negotiation and reconciliation possible. He looks at Israel, the Palestinians, Jordan, Egypt, Syria and the two superpowers from this angle, seeing the problems in all their complexity and intractability but not losing his faith in the possibility and the necessity of moving toward peace. The book itself, if widely read, could contribute to that end.