In This Review

Vengeance: India After the Assassination of Indira Gandhi
Vengeance: India After the Assassination of Indira Gandhi
By Pranay Gupte
Norton, 1985, 368 pp

The author, a foreign correspondent for The New York Times, has written an informed and readable survey of the opportunities and challenges facing Rajiv Gandhi. He believes that India has the best chance of all the large developing countries of overcoming the poverty of its masses because of rising levels of education, the solid underpinnings of cultural richness, India's self-sufficiency in food, and the infrastructure for wider economic growth now in place. In an interesting foreword, James W. Michaels, editor of Forbes, indicates why he thinks Rajiv will be unable to break India's close trade, military and international political association with the Soviet Union. At the same time, he points out that India's survival as a democracy is more important to world freedom than is India's support for U.S. policies in the United Nations.