In This Review

Estrangement: America and the World
Estrangement: America and the World
Edited by Sanford J. Ungar
Oxford, 1985, 347 pp

The twelve authors of the reflective essays in this volume are all well-known and accomplished commentators on the foibles of American foreign policy, e.g., Frances Fitzgerald, James Chace, Lester Thurow and Richard Ullman. They agree that the United States has become deeply estranged from most of the rest of the world during the past quarter-century, and they offer a variety of overlapping reasons: hubristic interventionism combined paradoxically with isolationist longings, a gross concentration on and exaggeration of the Soviet threat, a failure to understand different cultures. Although many of the arguments will be familiar to those who attend to foreign policy issues, this is a valuable primary source on the disillusioned liberalism of the mid-1980s.