In This Review

The Rise of the Trading State: Commerce and Conquest in the Modern World
The Rise of the Trading State: Commerce and Conquest in the Modern World
By Richard Rosecrance
Basic Books, 1986, 268 pp

It is a familiar thought that nations cannot escape being concerned both with military power and welfare based on civilian pursuits and the international division of labor. But the mix can vary. A survey of history and a study of contemporary interdependence lead Professor Rosecrance of Cornell to the conclusion that there is a strong movement toward emphasizing the benefits of trading and cooperation except on the part of the two superpowers and some of the Third World. Even there he finds signs of a shift, but one wishes he had dealt more rigorously with the connection between Soviet-American relations and the freedom of choice of other countries, and with the nature of the power they acquire by being "trading states."