In This Review

The Arms Control Delusion
The Arms Control Delusion
By Malcolm Wallop and Angelo Codevilla
Institute for Contemporary Studies, 1987, 220 pp.
Through the Straits of Armageddon: Arms Control Issues and Prospects
Through the Straits of Armageddon: Arms Control Issues and Prospects
Edited by Paul F. Diehl and Loch K. Johnson
University of Georgia Press, 1987, 279 pp.

The Wallop-Codevilla critique of arms control from the right is familiar but breezily put: the United States expected too much and got too little. In particular, the book repeats the litany that America has "zero means for enforcing" Soviet compliance with existing treaties. For the authors, arms control is preeminently a domestic matter; as Walter Lippmann said of the run-up to World War II, "the disarmament movement has been tragically successful in disarming the nations that believe in disarmament." In this perspective, not surprisingly, President Reagan's conversion to arms reductions amounts to virtual apostasy. The Diehl-Johnson volume is balanced, and the foreword by Dean Rusk is a treat-the elder statesman's skepticism about dramatic predictions from either right or left, about either weapons capabilities or the imminence of doom.