In This Review

They Cannot Kill Us All: An Eyewitness Account Of South Africa Today
They Cannot Kill Us All: An Eyewitness Account Of South Africa Today
By Richard Manning
Houghton Mifflin, 1987, 255 pp

Although journalists' accounts of their personal experience of apartheid will for some time suffer from comparison with Joseph Lelyveld's Move Your Shadow, Manning, former Newsweek correspondent, succeeds in his story of his nine months in South Africa in vividly updating our images of the pitched battle between blacks and whites which continued from 1984 into 1987. Manning's tour coincided with an upsurge in black-black violence, and he handles fairly sensitively the material he gathered from black activists in the townships and from some of their targets. His puzzle is missing an important piece, however: nowhere does he take the same sort of long look at the government-supported black vigilantes.