In This Review

Imperial State And Revolution: The United States And Cuba, 1952-1986
Imperial State And Revolution: The United States And Cuba, 1952-1986
By Morris H. Morley
Cambridge University Press, 1988, 571 pp.

This painstakingly detailed examination of U.S. policy toward Cuba from Eisenhower to Reagan is both illuminated and obscured by its organizing concept-that an "imperial state" creates and sustains the conditions for worldwide capitalist accumulation-and by the jargon this framework imposes. The basic argument is that the activities of the imperial state typically polarize Third World societies and lead to the emergence of nationalist regimes espousing noncapitalist paths of development-and that the imperial state responds by intervening militarily, economically and politically, in order to displace or at least constrain these antagonists of imperial policy.