In This Review

Reforming Defense: The State Of American Civil-Military Relations

Reforming Defense: The State Of American Civil-Military Relations
By David C. Hendrickson
152 pp, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1988
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This slim volume, a companion to the author's The Future of American Strategy, is a graceful summary of recent initiatives in military reform, especially that led by Gary Hart. Moreover, it goes on to locate that debate in the larger terrain of the civil-military, echoing Samuel Huntington's conclusion of 30 years ago that "a lesser measure of civilian control and lower standards of military professionalism are the continuing prices the American people will have to pay for the other benefits of their constitutional system." And Hendrickson's conclusions about the strategic implications of reform are provocative: it would "weaken one of the primary pillars of deterrence in Europe . . . and . . . deprive the United States of the military instruments whose use would be most consistent with the limited nature of American interests throughout the Third World."