In This Review

The Future Of The International System: The United States And The World Political Economy
The Future Of The International System: The United States And The World Political Economy
By Theodore Geiger
Unwin Hyman, 1988, 190 pp

The high degree of international economic integration and "political coordination" achieved in the period between 1945 and 1970 is eroding and "these disintegrative trends are likely to continue for the foreseeable future." Not the least of the reasons is that the United States "will no longer assume a disproportionate share of the costs of integration," politically as well as economically. The best hope is to devise methods of "managing the neomercantilist trend" that has emerged. Some fairly concrete ideas for doing this are worked out in this thoughtful book, but readers may be excused for wondering whether these measures will really check the erosion. There can be little doubt, however, about Mr. Geiger's main thesis. As an American economist who played a part in building the postwar order, he fully appreciates what is being lost but retains his old vigor in marshaling arguments for the future.