Alternative To Intervention: A New U.S.-Latin American Security Relationship

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Alternative To Intervention: A New U.S.-Latin American Security Relationship

Edited by Richard J. Bloomfield and Gregory F. Treverton
Lynne Rienner, 1990
157 pp. $26.50
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This volume is the result of an inter-American collaborative project sponsored by the World Peace Foundation. Its aim was to see if the hemisphere could break out of a repeated pattern: the United States perceives a revolutionary movement in Latin America as threatening to its security; Latin Americans, fearing U.S. intervention more than worrying about the revolutionary movement, try to reassure Washington but do not go far enough to do so, in part because of their non-interventionist bias, with the result that ultimately the United States does intervene. With the waning of Soviet power and the collapse of Marxist models in Latin America, the exercise may seem more dated or irrelevant than it really is, for Panama underscores the possibility of fresh U.S. interventions, albeit for new purposes-drugs or terrorism instead of communism. A worthwhile contribution to the much-needed rethinking of inter-American institutions.

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