On Internal War: American And Soviet Approaches To Third World Clients And Insurgents

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On Internal War: American And Soviet Approaches To Third World Clients And Insurgents

By William E. Odom
Duke University Press, 1992
271 pp. $29.95
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The end of the Cold War has, after some delay, diminished the stream of works on strategy. It makes Odom's intriguing analysis of primarily historical interest. He aims to examine U.S.-Soviet competition in what used to be called broadly the Third World, to integrate the military dimension with external influences and internal sources of conflict. Reviewing cases in Latin America and Asia, his critique of American policy is biting: it has amounted to "colonialism by ventriloquy." Actual colonialism would have been better, and doing less-"cutting almost all direct aid to the client state and giving its military very little advice"-would not have been worse.