The Political Economy Of Third World Intervention: Mines, Money, And U.S. Policy In The Congo Crisis

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The Political Economy Of Third World Intervention: Mines, Money, And U.S. Policy In The Congo Crisis

By David N. Gibbs
University of Chicago Press, 1991
322 pp. $29.95
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Starting from the observation that the Eisenhower administration supported Katanga's secession from the Congo, whereas the Kennedy administration opposed it, this carefully researched and argued study makes the case for a "business conflict" model of foreign policymaking. The model supposes that many top policymakers, linked to business via revolving-door patterns of government and private sector hiring, are predisposed toward policies consistent with their business interests. The author believes that, although much of the evidence validating his model is only circumstantial, the model's explanatory power is such that it should at least be added to the roster of explanations (statist, pluralist, national character, instrumental and structural Marxist, bureaucratic politics, etc.) most frequently applied in the study of international relations.