In This Review
Who Owns Information? From Privacy to Public Access

Who Owns Information? From Privacy to Public Access

By Anne Wells Branscomb

BasicBooks, 1994, 241 pp.

A crisp and straightforward analysis by a leading communications and computer lawyer, this book does not bear directly, one might think, on international relations. Important issues emerge, however, from Branscomb's discussion of such questions as who owns your electronic messages and who owns government information. Undoubtedly, it is ever easier for foreigners to acquire a great deal of information about Americans as a whole, by class, or as individuals. Whether such information translates into knowledge is a different matter. One hopes that someone will explicitly address the implications of the information age for international relations in as direct and illuminating a fashion as Branscomb does here.