In This Review

Beyond the Promised Land: Jews and Arabs on a Hard Road to a New Israel
Beyond the Promised Land: Jews and Arabs on a Hard Road to a New Israel
By Glenn Frankel
Simon & Schuster, 1994, 416 pp
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During the past decade, Israel has been undergoing a quiet -- and sometimes not so quiet -- revolution. This change can sometimes be seen clearly, as in the 1992 electoral defeat of Likud and the subsequent opening of peace talks with the PLO. But it is also taking place more subtly, as a new generation of political leaders prepares to take over from the founding generation. Glenn Frankel, a talented Washington Post reporter who spent many years in Jerusalem, has a knack for sketching the personalities and moments that signal this transformation. He attributes importance to the intifada, which reopened the debate among Israelis about the costs of occupying the West Bank and Gaza; the 1990-91 Gulf crisis, which brought home to Israelis that their immediate neighbors were no longer the greatest threat to their security; and the arrival of new immigrants from the former Soviet Union, less ideological and more concerned with economic betterment. Despite all the remaining problems to be solved in the peace process, this book suggests that Israel is well on its way to adjusting to the realities of peace in a new Middle East.