In This Review

Surviving the Millennium: American Global Strategy, the Collapse of the Soviet Empire, and the Question of Peace
Surviving the Millennium: American Global Strategy, the Collapse of the Soviet Empire, and the Question of Peace
By Hall Gardner
Praeger Publishers, 1994, 261 pp

Despite the title, one will not find too much useful guidance here. (On the other hand, since the millennium is only five years away, surviving until then may not be as hard as it sounds.) This book was conceived and begun before the collapse of the Soviet empire, and like many such books it is disjointed. Half the text is a familiar history of the Cold War, arguing that the United States missed opportunities gradually to integrate the U.S.S.R. into the world system. The other half argues somewhat implausibly that the possibility of global conflict has become even greater since the end of the Cold War because the collapse of the Soviet Union has ended the "double containment" by America of its allies, particularly Germany and Japan. Many of the policy recommendations, such as U.N. units stationed in eastern Germany to allay Russian fears, or U.N. or CSCE "preventative war" military forces intervening in East European hot spots, are not particularly well thought out.