In This Review

Education in the Development of Tanzania, 1919-1990
Education in the Development of Tanzania, 1919-1990
By Lene Buchert
Ohio University Press, 1994, 192 pp

A detailed retrospective of education in Tanzania, highlighting parallels and continuities between the colonial and independence periods and analyzing the frequently wide discrepancies between theory and implementation of government policies. Britain, in the early years of its rule, emphasized gradual development at the base of the educational pyramid with a view toward raising rural productivity and forestalling the inconvenient growth of a politicized elite. Given the rising costs of empire after World War II, however, Britain replaced this mass-oriented approach with a new priority on elite and urban educational development to facilitate eventual political withdrawal. In a new political and economic context, Tanzania's initial postindependence leadership turned again to a rural, bottom-up emphasis in education to effect social transformation. Then, faced with harsh economic realities and its inability to implement the envisaged model, Tanzania again turned to a more quality-oriented, elite-focused approach, even though that meant sacrificing hard-won advances in mass literacy. A solid study for policy specialists, enhanced with an extensive bibliography and statistical tables.