In This Review

The Sino-Indian Border Dispute and Sino-Indian Relations
The Sino-Indian Border Dispute and Sino-Indian Relations
By Xuechenglliu
University Press Of America, 1994, 221 pp.

This volume by a young Chinese scholar who is now associated with the Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies in the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences is valuable for several reasons. Initially, it is the first analysis of the Chinese-Indian border dispute by a Chinese scholar, and it is remarkably balanced and free of polemics. Second, it seeks to place the Chinese-Indian relationship in the larger geopolitical context of the Cold War rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union and demonstrates how the end of the Cold War has led to new opportunities to improve Chinese-Indian relations. In September 1993, the Indian prime minister visited China and signed a "landmark" agreement that recognized the current line of actual control on the border. This agreement has been followed by talk about troop reductions and confidence-building measures. The author sees this accord as the first step toward a comprehensive border agreement that could have wider ramifications for peace in the region.