In This Review

Broken Covenant: American Foreign Policy and the Crisis Between the U.S. and Israel
Broken Covenant: American Foreign Policy and the Crisis Between the U.S. and Israel
By Moshe Arens
Simon & Schuster, 1995, 320 pp.

The title of this memoir by Israel's former foreign and defense minister promises a harsh indictment of American policy. There is indeed plenty of criticism of the Bush-Baker team's "interference" in Israeli politics via the withholding of unconditional loan guarantees in late 1991, but there is much more as well. Arens covers in revealing detail the early, unsuccessful efforts by Baker to get Mideast negotiations started in 1989. Then he deals with the Persian Gulf crisis of 1990-91 and concludes with the Madrid conference and its aftermath. Arens' political point of view colors his analysis, but he nonetheless provides fascinating vignettes of the diplomacy of the period. Some of his best sketches are of his fractious Likud colleagues. While he tends to blame Bush and Baker for Likud's defeat in 1992, his account shows that former Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir and other Likud leaders made many mistakes of their own.