In This Review

Asia and Africa: Legacies and Opportunities in Development
Asia and Africa: Legacies and Opportunities in Development
Edited by David L. Lindauer and Michael Roemer
Ics Press, 1994, 422 pp.

By marshaling extensive comparative data on the experiences of Asian and African countries in recent decades, this collection fills an important gap in the literature on African economic reform. The authors, all strong proponents of structural adjustment and export-led growth, address in very specific terms the question of which policies, practices, and countries in East and Southeast Asia might best serve as models for Africa. Eschewing a who's-to-blame approach, they focus on the need for African governments to choose growth over political expediency, improve macroeconomic management, better accommodate entrepreneurial ethnic minorities, invest more in human resources, and generally move away from economic regulation and toward freer market determination of labor costs, import flows, and exchange rates. Some of the discussion is technical, but noneconomists will find ample evidence to support the authors' principal conclusion that African countries can find the most instructive models not in the newly industrializing countries of East Asia but in the three new tigers of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations: Indonesia, Malaysia, and Thailand.