In This Review

Corruption, Democracy, and Human Rights in East and Central Africa
Corruption, Democracy, and Human Rights in East and Central Africa
Edited by Ayodele Aderinwale
Africa Leadership Forum, 1995, 167 pp

Among the major industrialized nations, the United States alone forbids bribes by businesses seeking foreign contracts. Elsewhere a culture of silence has tended to prevail, with some countries even permitting businesses to claim bribes as tax deductions. In Africa, where it is hard to find a government untainted by high-level ‘grand’ corruption, the salting away of illicit payments and the willful misinvestment of capital in crooked and nonproductive schemes contribute to sagging growth and burgeoning debt. In recent years progressive leaders in Africa have begun taking this problem seriously and, in cooperation with Transparency International, a Berlin-based nongovernmental organization established in 1993, they are demanding action to end corrupt business practices in both North and South. The poor editing of this report should not detract from its importance as a call for reform.