In This Review

Egypt From Monarchy to Republic: A Reassessment of Revolution and Change
Egypt From Monarchy to Republic: A Reassessment of Revolution and Change
Edited by Shimon Shamir
Westview Press, 1995, 352 pp

With the passage of time it becomes more difficult to argue that the 1952 revolution in Egypt was much of a revolution after all. As de Tocqueville noted, social and cultural continuities survive political upheavals, so one should not be surprised to find many features of the prerevolutionary period in present-day Egypt. This is not to say that nothing of consequence happened during Gamal Abdel Nasser’s reign. Certain things did change, especially concerning landholding, the distribution of income, and the role of the state in the economy. Those legacies are not so easily swept away, despite a policy of economic liberalization and the return of a semi-liberal political order, combined with an Islamic revival (all rather reminiscent of the 1930s). These are the themes with which the authors of this excellent volume grapple. Unfortunately, no Egyptian scholars are represented alongside the Israelis, Americans, and Europeans.