In This Review

Inside CIA’s Private World: Declassified Articles from the Agency’s Internal Journal, 1955-1992
Inside CIA’s Private World: Declassified Articles from the Agency’s Internal Journal, 1955-1992
Edited by H. Bradford Westerfield
Yale University Press, 1995, 489 pp
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Perhaps the most interesting classified journal of all time is Studies in Intelligence, an in-house publication of the CIA. The CIA invited Westerfield, a Yale professor who is a student of the intelligence community but, unlike some of his colleagues, not a sometime participant, to cull its secret articles for publication. The result is engrossing and fascinating. The articles include some of the best treatments of intelligence issues ever written, and they reveal a great deal about the internal culture of the CIA, not all of it complimentary. Westerfield’s commentary is spare, precise, and penetrating, his editorial judgment acute. With wry humor he highlights the folly of some of the CIA’s pretensions while providing context for such matters as the psychology of treason and the notorious Nosenko mole investigations of the 1960s. Most major fields of intelligence -- human reporting, imagery analysis, analysis, and counterespionage -- are well represented, but through no fault of the editor, signal intelligence is not covered. Given the well-known secretiveness of the National Security Agency, this hole will likely remain unfilled for some time.