In This Review

Coping With Conflict After the Cold War
Coping With Conflict After the Cold War
Edited by Edward A. Kolodziej and Roger E. Kanet
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996, 407 pp

There is hardly a topic in post-Cold War international politics this volume does not deal with, from discussions of U.S., Russian, Japanese, and Chinese perspectives on world order to chapters on the United Nations, the European Union, peacekeeping, arms control, and economics. Many of the individual contributions are good and overlap in interesting ways with those of the Lund and Brown volumes. The editors, however, have exercised less discipline in keeping the study focused, and the "template" offered for coping with conflict -- considerably less detailed than in the Lund and Brown books -- does not obviously emerge from the material presented.