In This Review

Winning the Peace: America and World Order in the New Era
Winning the Peace: America and World Order in the New Era
By John Gerard Ruggie
Columbia University Press, 1996, 288 pp

This excellent study seeks to articulate the policies of cooperative security and economic multilateralism necessary in America's "third attempt" at establishing world order in the twentieth century. "Remembering the future," Ruggie argues that Franklin Roosevelt's second attempt in 1945, centered around the concept of "concert-based collective security," constitutes a reliable guide to this task. The author, a political scientist at Columbia University, is particularly good in describing the evolution of the post-World War II system of economic multilateralism. He is cautiously optimistic about the stability of the contemporary system for trade and finance but worries that globalization has broken the social contract with workers that was a central part of the postwar bargain. ("Embedded liberalism," as it were, is getting disemboweled.) On security issues, Ruggie retains a faith in the United Nations that would seem to reflect the triumph of hope over experience. (To say this is not to disparage the importance of multilateralism in U.S. foreign policy but to insist that America's most important concert is with the G-7, not the p-5). His running dispute with "realists" sometimes degenerates into caricature, as running disputes tend to do. But the study is imaginative and discriminating in its use of historical materials and ranks among the best of recent attempts to describe the lineaments of the world order the United States and its partners should build in the future.