Makers of Modern Strategy: Military Thought From Machiavelli to Hitler

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Makers of Modern Strategy: Military Thought From Machiavelli to Hitler

Edited by Edward Mead Earle
Princeton University Press, 1943
547 pp.
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This book, which marks the birth of modern strategic studies, was, appropriately enough, published during World War II. Although it draws on the work of many talented historians (and many of its chapters remain unsurpassed), when taken together the essays lead the reader to conceive of a discipline of strategy, distinct from history and political science, although deeply indebted to them. This was one of the first books in this century to treat the study of means and ends of military power as a scholarly, and not only a practical, subject. Of course, some of the essays here are dated (for example, one on Japanese naval strategy), and a subsequent version edited by Peter Paret in 1986 has since taken and held the field. Furthermore, the editor seems to have wavered in deciding whether his topic was military thought or military action. Nonetheless, a landmark work.