In This Review

Europe Undivided: The New Logic of Peace in U.S.-Russian Relations
Europe Undivided: The New Logic of Peace in U.S.-Russian Relations
By James E. Goodby
U.S. Institute of Peace Press, 1998, 256 pp
Purchase

Goodby, a career diplomat, asks how Europe and, more specifically, the United States and Russia, can move from the "conditional peace" of the moment to a "stable peace." How, that is, they can get from a circumstance in which war is improbable but possible and deterrence by military means still relevant to one in which "the use of military force between two states is simply not considered" and nuclear deterrence no longer plays a role. Using his practitioner's experience in nuclear arms control and European security, including the development of a human rights regime, as well as the lessons of Yugoslavia, he first lays out a path by which "conditional peace" can be made more secure. This entails a reworked fusion of collective security and spheres of influence, but with practical suggestions for each step. From there he sketches an architecture and strategy by which, with American leadership, the great powers can give substance to President Clinton's oft-repeated commitment to a "peaceful, undivided, and democratic [European] continent."