In This Review

Women in the Military: Flirting With Disaster
Women in the Military: Flirting With Disaster
By Brian Mitchell
Regnery, 1998, 390 pp

An infantry officer and subsequently a journalist, Mitchell has very little doubt that the American military has not merely gone too far in mixing the sexes, but in so doing has compromised fundamental standards of honesty and honor. This is a fairly well-documented look at such issues as pregnancy rates, non-deployability, double standards in physical fitness, and sexual fraternization. The introduction of large numbers of women into military organizations without the insulation of separate women's corps (a feature of the first half of the century) is one of the greatest sociological changes in contemporary armed forces. Whether the price to be paid for equity and tapping a large and talented labor pool is too high will remain a matter of dispute, but it is hard to argue that there was a price. A book likely to be denounced or ignored, but the latter reaction, at the very least, would be misplaced. This is a polemic, but a serious one, and all the more interesting for the weight of contention on the opposing side.