In This Review

The Eighty Years' Crisis, 1919-1999
The Eighty Years' Crisis, 1919-1999
Edited by Michael Cox, Tim Dunne and Ken Booth
Cambridge University Press, 1999, 246 pp

Edited books on debates between international relations scholars about the "state of the field" are often the last place to look for fresh ideas about world politics. The controversies almost always focus on methods rather than the real world. But this volume is an exception. These essays by British and American scholars explore the great debates between international relations scholars as they assess the so-called "eighty years' crisis" -- this century's eight decades of world war and nuclear stalemate. Inspired by E. H. Carr's classic, The Twenty Years' Crisis, the volume also touches on the failures of liberal internationalism and the possibilities for peaceful international change. The contributions do not settle the great questions and lack some coherence, but together they demonstrate that broad historical controversies about war, peace, and the conditions for a stable international order are still alive and well.