In This Review

Unbroken Ties: The State, Interest Associations, and Corporatism in Post-Soviet Ukraine
Unbroken Ties: The State, Interest Associations, and Corporatism in Post-Soviet Ukraine
By Paul A. Kubicek
University of Michigan Press, 2000, 275 pp

Kubicek defines corporatism as a form of government under which the state opens itself to influence from privileged interest groups so long as they remain under its control. He argues that this model, not pluralistic democracy, characterizes Ukraine's political system. Rather than allowing a flowering of civil society, Ukraine remains stalled in a netherworld of traditional interests (agricultural bosses, old unions, and enterprise directors) who collaborate with the state to block change. Corporatism of this sort, it may be argued, offers stability in the chaos of transition, and it may be just a way station in the process of reform. Then again, as the author fears, it may sink roots that are not easily supplanted. A most useful, albeit scarcely cheery study, not least because it has a broad application to other post-Soviet states.