In This Review

Building Security in the New States of Eurasia: Subregional Cooperation in the Former Soviet Space
Building Security in the New States of Eurasia: Subregional Cooperation in the Former Soviet Space
Edited by Renata Dwan and Oleksandr Pavliuk
M. E. Sharpe, 2000, 304 pp

Although unfortunately ignored by the outside world, the post-Soviet territory continues to disintegrate and reintegrate as alignments grow ever more complex and political polarization slowly gathers force. To get a hard-headed, thoroughly informed sense of the patterns emerging, there is no better place to start than with this book. Indeed, it is the first and only attempt to size up the many inchoate attempts at subregional cooperation in the former Soviet Union. The topics are superbly chosen, ranging from the strategic grouping among Georgia, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Azerbaijan, and Moldova to the energy and transport network in Central Asia and the Caucasus; contributors also examine security in the contexts of subregional cooperation and the impact of Islam. The analysis is uniformly balanced and succinct. Combined, the essays convey how much is in the works while illuminating the height of the obstacles at every step of the way.