In This Review

African Foreign Policies: Power and Process
African Foreign Policies: Power and Process
Edited by Gilbert M. Khadiagala and Terrence Lyons
Lynne Rienner, 2001, 254 pp

The contributors to this generally high-quality collection have focused on continuity and change in African international relations, taking the Cold War's end as a watershed. Six chapters analyze subregions (anglophone and francophone western Africa, central Africa, the Great Lakes, the Horn, and southern Africa); one examines policymaking in the new South Africa; one, by William Reno, discusses stateless regions; and two present the editors' summations. All agree that although the making of foreign policy continues to be driven by the domestic political needs of rulers, in particular their urge to remain in power, these imperatives are played out in a context that in most respects is utterly changed. Not only has the international leverage of African leaders been drastically diminished in the globalizing post-Cold War world, they now sail in the largely uncharted waters of eroding norms of sovereignty, dwindling Western concern with Africa's poverty, a vacuum of ideological visions, and the growing power of external nonstate actors such as multinational corporations, nongovernmental organizations, crime syndicates, and CNN. A valuable text for students in this field.