In This Review

The Making of Chinese Foreign and Security Policy in the Era of Reform
The Making of Chinese Foreign and Security Policy in the Era of Reform
Edited by David M. Lampton
Stanford University Press, 2001, 508 pp.

Lampton has brought together an impressive group of scholars and journalists to examine just about every dimension of China's foreign relations. In the introduction, Lampton stresses the rapid advances that Beijing has made in professionalizing its foreign-policy establishment as well as the effects of globalization on reinforcing this learning process. Separate chapters then look at the institutions involved in making China's foreign policy, including provincial institutions; elite views and public opinion; the outside world's influence; and the resulting pressures to adhere to international standards. The final part consists of case studies: Bates Gill on arms control, Michael Swaine on Beijing's Taiwan policy, and Margaret Pearson on accession to the World Trade Organization. Throughout the volume, highly knowledgeable specialists pack in a great deal of information. The result is solid coverage -- but also dense prose that puts a heavy demand on the reader.