In This Review

Turkish Foreign Policy, 1774-2000
Turkish Foreign Policy, 1774-2000
By William M. Hale
Frank Cass, 2001, 375 pp

This is fully rounded diplomatic history at its best, offering an informed running account of Turkey's multifaceted foreign policy. One short chapter covers the Ottoman Empire from 1774 to 1918, and the two following chapters take the story up to 1945. The bulk of this book covers the Cold War era and after, with an especially thorough treatment of the post-1989 period. It first touches on Turkey and the West; then Turkey's relations with Greece, Cyprus, and the states of the Balkans and the Caucasus; and finally its policy toward Central Asia and the Middle East. That is a large number of states and regions to keep in balance, and Hale manages it beautifully. All the old and new issues are well covered -- Cyprus, the Kurds, Turkey's early post-Cold War ambitions in Central Asia followed by a more realistic stance, recent Turkish ties with Israel, and the impact of Turkey's domestic politics on foreign policy. In the introduction and conclusion, Hale assesses the continuity and change in Turkey's foreign policy over the last two centuries.